The start of a legacy

Senior discovers success in Mixed Martial Arts

Photo+courtesy+of+Arian+Soliz

Photo courtesy of Arian Soliz

Story by: Jimmy Pacheco, Sports Editor

From punch to punch and kick to kick, time flies when training begins. Every punch thrown brings him one step closer to success.

Senior Chris Soliz developed a passion for competition during his youth. In the sixth grade, he began participating in the 4oz Fight Club, a MMA-based school in Northern Houston. Soliz’s father became the owner of the fight club during his second year.

“It [fighting] feels good, and I feel I have an advantage because I get to train with some of the highest level professional and amateur fighters on a daily basis,” he said. “A lot of people don’t get that opportunity, especially at this age.”

Soliz made his official fighting debut this year after turning 17, the legal age to fight competitive MMA in Texas. Since then, he’s fought two official amateur fights and currently holds a 2-0 record. His next fight will take place on Dec.12, at the Houston Arena Theatre. The fight will be the biggest promotion for Legacy Fighting Championship in the nation.

“Now that I am an amateur fighter, I am trying to have at least three fights a year,” he said.

Soliz’s cousin Bob Perez, the head coach at 4oz, trained him during his younger years. Soliz said he really enjoyed learning boxing and Muay Thai from Perez. Muay Thai is a form of martial arts that is practiced around the world. In order for near perfection, Soliz practices his different techniques everyday nonstop. While it may get old sometimes, his mentality of striving for perfection brings the best out of him.

So I stuck with it and eventually started learning all disciplines of MMA,” he said. “I now have coaches for all the areas of MMA.”

His biggest struggle comes from dieting before a match. The diet consists of only fruits and vegetables and any sort of junk food is strictly prohibited according to him. While it may seem like a difficult task, Soliz does whatever it takes to bring the win home.

“It’s the worst,” he said.

MMA fighting became the greatest aspect of life to Soliz. He clarifies that this sport focus on competition and strength and not hurting one’s opponent.

“This is the sport I chose to do and learn,” Soliz said. “Now, five years later, I’m actually fighting competitively, and it feels good to finally be able to use all the skills I’ve been learning for five years in real competition. I really just enjoy the competitiveness and hard work/discipline that you must have to do this.”

After high school, Soliz plans to keep fighting and eventually go professional. In a few years following high school, he intends to keep training for Legacy Fighting Championship then hopefully make it to the biggest stage in all MMA, the UFC.

“It feels good because I know I’ve put in a lot of work, and train with some of the top fighters in Texas on a daily basis,” Soliz said.